Deborah Levy’s Cost of Living

Deborah Levy, The Cost of Living (Hamish Hamilton 2018)


I’m a member of two book clubs. One of them is all men, and at each meeting we discuss one book that there’s a sporting chance a majority of us will have read. The other is all about swapping books, and there’s a rule (one of many: one club member is a high-flying lawyer) that no book may be discussed for more than 30 seconds. Generally each of us brings three books to the club, and takes a different three home. At our last meeting I borrowed Diane Athill’s Alive, Alive Oh! (my blog post here) and The Cost of Living. I loved Alive, Alive Oh!

The Cost of Living is exactly the book that some writers of genre fiction, disgruntled at being dismissed as of a lesser breed, describe as LitFic. It’s a very short, introspective first-person account of the life of a woman writer after the end of her decades-long marriage, rich with threads of metaphor and learned allusions, studded with aphorisms and beautifully described scenes. It has at least two big subjects: the end of a marriage and the death of a mother. I was half way through it when I happened to read on the dustjacket flaps that it is the second instalment of Deborah Levy’s ‘living autobiography’, the first volume of which is a ‘memoir on writing, gender politics and philosophy’.

I didn’t hate it. I read all 187 pages. But it’s not my cup of tea. Someone who really loved the book might think that’s because I’m a white, heterosexual man of a certain age, eligible for the nickname ‘the Big Silver’ which the narrator/author bestows on one of the book’s many men who patronise, ignore, disregard or otherwise deny the humanity of women. But I didn’t dislike the gender politics as such. I just kept wondering why I should be interested in this book. I got a lot of clues: the author mentions several other books she has written, and a possible movie deal, and famous people she knows (we are carefully informed, for example, that Celia – no second name – the woman who lends her a garden shed to write in, is the widow of the poet Adrian Mitchell*). And of course, the first part of the memoir – Things I don’t Want to Know – may have set the reader up to be interested.

Look, here’s a short passage. It contains a few darlings that should have been killed, though to be fair there are possibly more per square inch than in most of the book. If you like it you’ll probably find the whole book something you can enjoy and benefit from more than I did. She is writing about the gardener who tends Celia’s garden:

Sometimes he’d pick a small bunch of herbs and winter flowers from the garden and bring them to me in the shed. I could not tell him that it was flowers that triggered some of the most painful flashbacks to my old life. How can a flower inflame a wound? It can and it does if it is a portal to the past. How can a flower reveal information about minor and major characters? It can and it does. How is it that a flower can resemble a criminal. For the writer and criminal Jean Genet, the striped uniform of convicts reminded him of flowers. Both flowers and flags are required to do so much of the talking for us, but I am not really sure I know what it is they are saying.

(page 107)

*She’s Celia Hewitt for whom Adrian Mitchell wrote his wonderful poem ‘Celia Celia’ (you can read it here)

5 responses to “Deborah Levy’s Cost of Living

  1. 30 seconds to pitch a book! No wonder you were lured into something that was no fun to read…
    I am starting to think that contemporary writing has become less imaginative and more self-obsessed and whiny. Have writers run out of ideas, or is it just that ours is a narcissistic era?
    Fortunately I have just read Stephen Orr’s latest book (called This Excellent Machine), and it has restored my optimism about contemporary storytelling.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The rule is very often broken, but it’s the thought that counts. I do think, though, that this book will appeal strongly to some readers, probably those who already know and enjoy Deborah Levy’s work. Like I enjoy Bob Dylan’s recent albums but lord knows what someone would make of his rendition of ‘Some Enchanted Evening’ if it was their first encounter with him

      Like

  2. I haven’t yet read Deborah Levy, but I was encouraged by the 187p. Not that I don’t like long books, but I like the tautness that so many short books have. However, that excerpt you provided hasn’t grabbed me, so I won’t be adding this to my TBR given all that’s there now.

    Like

    • Some books just rub me the wrong way, Sue. This was one of them. At least one friend – perhaps relevantly, someone who lost a partner to cancer, and made a film about grieving her – loved it.

      Liked by 1 person

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