NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Night

The NSWPLA night used to be a grand affair. Long before my time there was a bread-roll throwing affair when Morris West droned on too long in his acceptance speech. I got to be on the free list one year, then coughed up good money for a number of years after that, and one year I got to be the plus one of my shortlisted niece. It became less fun when it changed from being a full-blown dinner to a drinks and powerpoint affair, but I still followed it, at least on Twitter. (I dutifully blogged the event for quite a while, and if you really want to, you can plough through my blog posts for 2006, 2007, 2009, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017).

This year, thanks to the Great Leveller, SARS-Cov2, it was again possible to attend the whole event without stirring from home or spending a cent.

So here’s how it went:

After an elegant introduction by John Vallance, Chief Librarian, speaking to us from an empty Mitchell Library, President of the Library Council, George Souris spoke from his home and introduced Gladys Berejiklian, who somehow found time to record a short message. John Vallance then did the announcement without any frills apart from little speeches from a range of relevant politicians:

Multicultural NSW Award went to The Pillars by Peter Polites (Hachette Australia). Peter did a to-camera piece expressing gratitude to, among other things, his publisher’s bowties.

Nick Enright Prize for Playwriting: Counting and Cracking, S Shakthidharan and auxiliary writer Eamon Flack. The writer, the second from Western Sydney: This award helps to weave this little story from Western Sydney into the tapestry of all the great Austraoian stories.’ Eamon Flack used his platform to contrast the ‘neglect and carelessness’ of current art policy with teh years of policy that enabled Counting and Cracking to happen.

Betty Roland Prize for Scriptwriting: joint winners The Cry, Episode 2, Jacquelin Perske (Synchronicity Films), and Missing, Kylie Boltin (SBS). Kylie Boltin dedicated the award to her mother and grandmother. Her grandmother died yesterday. Jacqueline Piersk

Patricia Wrightson Prize for Children’s Literature: Ella and the Ocean, Lian Tanner, Jonathan Bentley (Allen & Unwin). Both author and illustrator spoke. She spoke of starting the book twelve years ago and then leaving it in the folder marked ‘Abject Failures’ for years. He, a humble illustrator: ‘Thank you for choosing me.’

Ethel Turner Prize for Young People’s Literature: Lenny’s Book of Everything, Karen Foxlee (Allen & Unwin). Karen said, ‘I want to use this platform to thank readers everywhere who continue to buy books in these times. I want to thank everyone who supports the arts.’

Kenneth Slessor Prize for Poetry: Enfolded in the Wings of a Great Darkness, Peter Boyle (Vagabond Press). Peter Boyle paid tribute to his late partner Debora Bird Rose (herself a great writer).

Indigenous Writers’ Prize: The White Girl, Tony Birch (University of Queensland Press); Tony Birch gave a shout out to ‘every B;ackfella across Australia who is writing’.

Douglas Stewart Prize for Non-Fiction: from 136 entries, the winner was Tiberius With a Telephone, Patrick Mullins (Scribe Publications), a book about William McMahon. Patrick Mullins, looking scarily young, acknowledged his debt to writers and journalists whose work was important to his , and to the many people he interviewed.

UTS Glenda Adams Award for New Writing: Real Differences, SL LIM (Transit Lounge). SL LIM looked even younger, with pink hair and a soft toy, and plugged her coming book, which (I think I heard correctly) calls for the end of the family

Fiction (Christina Stead Award): The Yield, Tara June Winch (Penguin Random House). Tara June Winch spoke of the centrality of language to human life. ‘It is a sacred thing,’ she said, in Wiradjuri. The Yield also won the People’s Choice Award and the Book of the Year. Tara June Winch got to speak again, and spoke of her esteem and fellow feeling for the other writers having a hard time just now. She asked the Federal Government to that ‘our sector’ as our families do. ‘We can’t tell you the story of what is happening to our country now if the only thing on our minds how to afford the next weeks rent.’ She hopes that our First Languages will be included in our schools’ curriculum.

That was it. It turns out that though I’d read a couple of the shortlisted books, I hadn’t read a single one of the winners, and had seen only one of the performances – the absolutely stunning Counting and Cracking.

You can watch the whole ceremony at

4 responses to “NSW Premier’s Literary Awards Night

  1. Darn it! I had this in the calendar to watch and I got completely sidetracked by practising Zoom with my reading group! I have read The white girl and The yield. I am thrilled to see The yield win. SO, rarely, I’ve read two of the winners!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I’ll second that, Sue:)
    And I’m pleased to see S L Lim’s book win a prize, she’s an interesting writer.
    I’ll get my own post about this ASAP:)
    Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Pingback: 2020 NSW Premier’s Literary Awards winners | ANZ LitLovers LitBlog

  4. I’ve just found that the first Sydney Writers Festival was 1997. But I remember attending what I have long thought was the first Sydney Writers Festival event – but was clearly only a forerunner – I think it was 1983 at the Sydney Town Hall. I recall Trevor Shearston and a panel on the stage and in the first few rows of seats – maybe 30 or 40 people? Among them Betty Roland – and Nance Donkin (to whom I spoke – having just recently read her lyrical piece on a period of time she and her husband had spent on Mytilene – and actually, as I realised some five years later – presaging the nearly a month my wife and I spent on Samos – in the spring. Magical. But writers speaking in front of audiences was not a big thing back then. Maybe you or one of your blog-fans might have a clearer memory of what it was I was attending…

    Like

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